Revolution of the Mind: Higher Learning among the Bolsheviks, 1918–1929 (Studies of the Harriman Institute) by Michael David-Fox

Using archival materials never previously accessible to Western scholars, Michael David-Fox analyzes Bolshevik Party educational and research initiatives in higher learning after 1917. His fresh consideration of the era of the New Economic Policy and cultural politics after the Revolution explains how new communist institutions rose to parallel and rival conventional higher learning from the Academy of Sciences to the universities. Beginning with the creation of the first party school by intellectuals on the island of Capri in 1909, David-Fox argues, the Bolshevik cultural project was tightly linked to party educational institutions. He provides the first account of the early history and politics of three major institutions founded after the Revolution: Sverdlov Communist University, where the quest to transform everyday life gripped the student movement; the Institute of Red Professors, where the Bolsheviks sought to train a new communist intellectual or red specialist; and the Communist Academy, headquarters for a planned, collectivist, proletarian science.

Author: Michael David-Fox

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
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Sugbo by King Macachor

Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition to find the Spice islands comes alive in this historical novel. You’ll love Jonas Martin, a twenty one year old stow-away, who portrays the principal character. He suffers monotony, disease and hunger until he finds his, Ilang-ilang, a beautiful princess in Sugbo. She was his fortune.

Author: King Macachor

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Sugbo by King Macachor

Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition to find the Spice islands comes alive in this historical novel. You’ll love Jonas Martin, a twenty one year old stow-away, who portrays the principal character. He suffers monotony, disease and hunger until he finds his, Ilang-ilang, a beautiful princess in Sugbo. She was his fortune.

Author: King Macachor

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Operation Phoenix by Andy Lock

Adolf Hitler escapes war torn Europe at the end of 1944. Colonel Max Friedel of the SS has the job of protecting him along their arduous journey. Lt Colonel Tom Hunter of the SAS is on their tail, hoping to bring Hitler to justice. A hard fought battle is waged on the ice, at the far end of the world. History isn’t always how its written.

Author: Andy Lock

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Filling in the Pieces: A Survival Story of the Holocaust by Izaak Sturm

This autobiography is a compelling tale of an individual who survived the full brunt of the Shoah as a teenager, from the first day of the war in the small town of Dembitz in 1939 to liberation in Bergen Belsen in 1945. The book first provides a nostalgic of Izaak’s prewar life and goes on to detail how his family and community were gradually torn asunder by the Nazi occupation. During the war, Izaak was variously imprisoned in ghettos, work camps, and notorious concentration camps, all the while enduring and witnessing horrific cruelty all around him. Each step of his grueling six year journey is carefully remembered and documented in this transfixing memoir. Despite the magnitude of what Izaak faced, he was able to survive in body and spirit. Preserving the seed of religious life planted by his family and community, he was able to rebuild his entire world.

Author: Izaak Sturm

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Mysticism in Nepal and Tibet, The Himalayan Journals of M.G. Hawking: June 2019 Edition Exploratory Anthology by M.G. Hawking

New Release There has long been a deep desire felt by scholars, both past and present, to recover the silent secrets of the ancient cultures of Tibet and Nepal, to trace the background of their prehistoric spiritual development as derived from ever earlier cultures, and then to discover whatever modern manifestations might still exist in the remote margins of that mysterious world. This desire has exerted a powerful pull on the imaginations of Westerners—historians, philologists, Tibetologists, philosophers, physicists, and psi researchers alike.Composed from the journals of explorer M.G. Hawking’s five years in remote areas of the Himalayas, this book transports the reader into regions of our planet that in all history only a handful of people have experienced, a journey that leads to the discovery of the most refined and powerful mystical knowledge possessed by the human race.’Mystical’ adj. 1.1 Having a spiritual significance that transcends human understanding; 1.3 Of hidden or esoteric meaning; 2.0 Inspiring a sense of spiritual mystery, awe, and fascination; 2.1 Concerned with the soul or spirit, rather than with material things; 2.2 Having a spiritual meaning or reality that is neither apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence. Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press, 2nd Ed., 1989.Experience has proven that this mystical knowledge offers the illumination and guidance necessary to create a superlative life, but of which few have a full appreciation. If truly understood through patient study, fully integrated into your core belief system, and practiced with unwavering diligence, this knowledge can wholly transform your experience of this world in every positive way imaginable.Many years ago, on an extended trek into a largely unexplored inner region of the vast wilderness of the Himalayas, Hawking chanced on an unexpected find. In a majestic valley surrounded by towering ice peaks, he encountered a beautiful small village called Siddhalaya. In that community he had the privilege of meeting a number of truly extraordinary men and women. This encounter marked the beginning of sixty-two months Hawking spent in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet, during which time he kept detailed records of his adventures, experiences, and conversations with those highly enlightened individuals.In association with Hawking, over the past several years our team at Wisdom Masters Press has worked diligently to compose a series of books based on his journals and field notes. This was a daunting assignment; Hawking accumulated a rich treasury of over 14,000 pages of hand-written journal notes, along with another 4,500 pages of field notes. It was a fascinating if formidable task, one that could not have been accomplished without the assistance and encouragement of some of the extraordinary individuals Hawking met in the Himalayas, experiences that filled everyone involved with a deep sense of awe and wonder.About this Book: This volume presents a comprehensive anthology of excerpts from seven books containing detailed narratives of Hawking’s various experiences and conversations, including first-hand accounts of the psychokinetic abilities he witnessed and in-depth descriptions of the esoteric knowledge that made such extraordinary abilities possible. Includes a suggested reading list with book descriptions.New Release, Kindle e-reader page count 182 (estimated, actual page count varies with the reading device used). For more information, please see the ‘Look Inside’ feature on this page. Thank you.Library-Cataloging-Data: Himalayan masters, wisdom, ancient mysteries, higher knowledge, secret knowledge, spirituality, esoteric knowledge, arcane traditions, true magic, psychokinesis, extrasensory perception, metaphysical, visualization, affirmation, manifesting, Nepal, Tibet

Author: M.G. Hawking

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
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Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England: Ravenous Natures (Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine) by Alanna Skuse

This book is open access under a CC-BY licence. Cancer is perhaps the modern world’s most feared disease. Yet, we know relatively little about this malady’s history before the nineteenth century. This book provides the first in-depth examination of perceptions of cancerous disease in early modern England. Looking to drama, poetry and polemic as well as medical texts and personal accounts, it contends that early modern people possessed an understanding of cancer which remains recognizable to us today. Many of the ways in which medical practitioners and lay people imagined cancer – as a ‘woman’s disease’ or a ‘beast’ inside the body – remain strikingly familiar, and they helped to make this disease a byword for treachery and cruelty in discussions of religion, culture and politics. Equally, cancer treatments were among the era’s most radical medical and surgical procedures. From buttered frog ointments to agonizing and dangerous surgeries, they raised abiding questions about the nature of disease and the proper role of the medical practitioner.

Author: Alanna Skuse

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
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A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945-1980 (Mental Health in Historical Perspective) by Alison Haggett

This book is open access under a CC BY license.Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Author: Alison Haggett

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945-1980 (Mental Health in Historical Perspective) by Alison Haggett

This book is open access under a CC BY license.Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Author: Alison Haggett

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews