Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (The Reader’s Library Book 8) by Edgar Allan Poe

A complete collection of the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Poe was born on January 19th in Boston, Massachusetts in 1809, and died in his adopted home of Baltimore, Maryland on October 7th, 1849, making him the first American writer in this series.The critical estimation of Poe’s work has increased dramatically over the course of my lifetime, which has been satisfying to observe, as he was for me—as I believe for so many lovers of literature—an early favorite, particularly because of his verse, which is rich with sonic texture and gothic subject matter: insanity, darkness, ghosts, death, etc. It is also quite manageable to read in its entirety at 75 poems depending on how many of those of questionable authorship or in various stages of completion one is willing to include in the official oeuvre. (In fact, it has been some time since I’ve heard the old familiar slight that his popularity in France during the 19th century was perhaps due to his writing gaining something of substance from Charles Baudelaire’s translations.) While perhaps not quite as dramatically prescient in new utterance, form or philosophical depth as Walt Whitman or Emily Dickinson, he certainly was as wise an observer of human nature, and equally brilliant at capturing the psychological nuances of passionate feeling and the frustrating process of understanding human experience. He also had an exquisite ear for language which has made his poems some of the most enjoyable to memorize and recite of all those in English-language verse: “The Raven” and “Annabelle Lee” immediately spring to mind, as does “The Bells,” once beautifully put to music by the American folk singer, Phil Ochs, to offer an example of the breadth of Poe’s influence and the joy with which generations of readers embrace his poems. And to be sure, beyond the varying critical estimation of his output, there is no questioning his popularity. How many 19th century writers get such unique accolades as the naming of a professional sport franchise’s mascot, or their very own bobble head, after all? And in that spirit I am delighted to offer these 75 selections as an official offering of his full poetic output for your personal assessment and, I am confidant, enjoyment.

Author: Edgar Allan Poe

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

American Pathfinder (Pathfinders Series Book 1) by Frank Mitchell

In April of 1798, Napoleon appoints Lieutenant Charles MacDonald, a nineteen-year-old graduate geographical engineer, to be the pathfinder for his personal Brigade of Guides during the invasion of Egypt. Charles was born in Virginia during the American Revolution and was educated in France, a graduate of L’Ecole Polytechnique and a postgraduate of L’Ecole des Ponts.But agents of the British Secret Service who are trying to undermine the invasion of Egypt interfere in Charles’s journey on a number of occasions by attempting to rob the mail coaches he is accompanying.In response, General Bonaparte assign Charles’s father, the blind General James MacDonald, his confidant and instructor in engineering and mapmaking at L’Ecole Militaire more than a decade earlier, to head a secret section investigating the British and these crimes. What they uncover is an abandoned convent in Paris being used as a headquarters–with 3.5 million francs in gold hidden in its walls.After four years at The Citadel, Frank Mitchell commanded infantry units in Vietnam in intensive combat for over a year. For the next forty years, he worked on construction projects all over the world. Initially a project engineer, Mitchell moved up to project manager and finally International Project Executive. He built hospitals, laboratories, military facilities, industrial factories, office buildings, bands, and other high security facilities, like embassies and consulates. Mitchell spent time in Egypt building the International Medical Center in the Egyptian desert. While there, he got the idea for this book. Mitchell has visited the sites of most of the battlefields in this and subsequent books in his Pathfinders Series.

Author: Frank Mitchell

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Minding the Spectrum’s Business by Irene Mitchell

Minding the Spectrum’s Business is a work set on a path that is personal, as well as universal, in appeal. In this collection, the poet, recording the perks and pitfalls of her life, embarks upon an existential journey during which a pattern of movement comes to light: propulsion and drag. The poet formally establishes the balance between the two. The leitmotifs in the poems are the elements of nature, tidal relationships, and certain “pulls” akin to Beckettian diversions, all of which play out within the context of solitude. Each dwelling place of the mind, each new station is explored from the vantage point of some unique landscape, be it an arc in the spectrum, or a spare room.

Author: Irene Mitchell

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Welcome To Hollyweird Collection by Dennis Copelan

Dennis Copelan’s characters often escape the bounds of their apparently ordinary lives in this compelling collection set on the fringes of Hollywood. Welcome To Hollyweird offers twelve thought-provoking, humorous and poignant stories that delve deeply into the quirks of human nature, often with surprising results. Sometimes dark, sometimes hilarious but always sharply observed, these tales probe our fundamental desires to connect and understand the power of love.

Author: Dennis Copelan

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Swimming This by Christine Swint

SWIMMING THIS is a touching and moving account of a woman’s personal journey toward self discovery and wholeness. Weaving together memory, myth, dreams, and folklore, these poems chronicle a woman’s family of origin, her experiences as a young mother, her harrowing encounters with an unscrupulous doctor, and the hard-won peace that comes through art and love.

Author: Christine Swint

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Another City by Steve Coughlin

In his debut collection of poetry, Steve Coughlin examines the severity of family trauma on both personal memory and the human psyche. Written in an accessible, colloquial voice that poet J. Allyn Rosser describes as “strong, versatile, original…[and] capable of radically different tones and angles of approach,” these poems move from haunted laments to playful musings as they negotiate the complexities of grief with the desire to escape into the imagination’s safe refuge. Ultimately, in ANOTHER CITY Coughlin depicts the harsh struggles of a working class family and leaves readers to consider what healing, if any, the imagined world can offer.

Author: Steve Coughlin

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

In Defense of Puppets by Anthony DiMatteo

An urgent question drives this book: what is it to speak for another? Technology today often makes us feel as if we can speak for or as another. But this is an illusion. It is crucial that we remain seriously and playfully alert to the active role our imaginings have in the shaping of what we think we know of ourselves and others. Poetry is vital to raising this awareness. “Art is puppet-like,” the poet Paul Celan observed. This collection of poems, some in formal, some in free verse, explores the ironies, humor, emotions, and visions produced by such multifaceted puppetry, its pleasures and dangers, its role in both grief and joy, in experience and recollection.

Author: Anthony DiMatteo

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Incomplete: The Second Book of Poems by Timothious by Timothious Smith

When you find an old notebook you never know what you will find some times. I was going through what I thought was a notebook with my first book of poems in it. Instead I found a few poems that I had left out for one reason or another. Which leads to this book and it’s title. This is a group of poems that I wrote over several years about several different subjects. Mostly about relationships and love. I hope you enjoy these poems.

Author: Timothious Smith

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

July’s Thick Kingdom by Kathleen Brewin Lewis

In prose poems and lineated poems, sonnets and free verse, Kathleen Brewin Lewis writes about the seasons—of the calendar year and of family life. JULY’S THICK KINGDOM moves the reader through snowstorms and thick pollen into summer’s bounty and the bittersweet beauty of fall, from her children’s childhood to her parents’ old age. “The words go on, a braided rope”—in her second chapbook, Lewis means to mark the passage of time.

Author: Kathleen Brewin Lewis

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews