The Battle Lost: Ryder’s Birth by Richard M Knittle Jr.

An Epic Poetry Adventure that takes you on a emotional journey into one mans epic battle against the evil’s of addiction and the search and fight for his son Ryder whom is not of his blood.

As the battle starts with hope now gone
a child is born his fourth son
Born from sins and lies of faith
the baby comes with much at stake
His birthing one was lost to war
a casualty of drugs and more
The man who laid his white flag down
was fighting hard to stand his ground
His losses struck deep within his soul
the battles he fought have taken their toll
Though not of his blood and further still
the man and baby grow closer till
The bond they made shall never break
their souls combined for mankind’s sake
The man gave kindness from his heart
and he taught the child right from the start
With the evil now listening and watching more
a baby was coming that would change the war
As darkness was gathering its troops from the east
they were training with armies of the state’s blue beast
With his birthing one ready she kept getting higher
but the baby came early and his name was Ryder

Author: Richard M Knittle Jr.

Rating: Rating: 4.40 / 5
18 reviews

The Battle Lost: Ryder’s Birth by Richard M Knittle Jr.

An Epic Poetry Adventure that takes you on a emotional journey into one mans epic battle against the evil’s of addiction and the search and fight for his son Ryder whom is not of his blood.

As the battle starts with hope now gone
a child is born his fourth son
Born from sins and lies of faith
the baby comes with much at stake
His birthing one was lost to war
a casualty of drugs and more
The man who laid his white flag down
was fighting hard to stand his ground
His losses struck deep within his soul
the battles he fought have taken their toll
Though not of his blood and further still
the man and baby grow closer till
The bond they made shall never break
their souls combined for mankind’s sake
The man gave kindness from his heart
and he taught the child right from the start
With the evil now listening and watching more
a baby was coming that would change the war
As darkness was gathering its troops from the east
they were training with armies of the state’s blue beast
With his birthing one ready she kept getting higher
but the baby came early and his name was Ryder

Author: Richard M Knittle Jr.

Rating: Rating: 4.40 / 5
18 reviews

Mr. Getaway and the Christmas Elves (Rhyming Bedtime Story/Children’s Picture Book About the Joy of Giving) by Sally Huss

A classroom full of kids is excited that their substitute teacher, Mr. Getaway, is going to take them on a field trip. Mr. Getaway always has the something exciting in mind and this trip is not different – Santa’s workshop!

Elves are everywhere, working happily, and creating mounds of toys. There is not a sad face in all the activity. Not a bit of complaining about the work. What did the kids learn from watching the elves? They learned that work is good! Santa agreed!

All in rhyme, this delightful story is charmingly illustrated with over 40 images.

If you enjoy the books of Dr. Seuss, the Berenstains, Suzy Spafford, Sandra Boynton, and Laura Numeroff, you’ll love MR. GATEAWAY AND THE CHRISTMAS ELVES.

If this sounds like something you would like, scroll up to download your copy.

You might also want to take a peek at THE TREE-WITHIN-THE TREE, another delightful holiday book by Sally Huss.

Author: Sally Huss

Rating: Rating: 4.40 / 5
97 reviews

Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (The Reader’s Library Book 8) by Edgar Allan Poe and Neil Azevedo

A complete collection of the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Poe was born on January 19th in Boston, Massachusetts in 1809, and died in his adopted home of Baltimore, Maryland on October 7th, 1849, making him the first American writer in this series.The critical estimation of Poe’s work has increased dramatically over the course of my lifetime, which has been satisfying to observe, as he was for me—as I believe for so many lovers of literature—an early favorite, particularly because of his verse, which is rich with sonic texture and gothic subject matter: insanity, darkness, ghosts, death, etc. It is also quite manageable to read in its entirety at 75 poems depending on how many of those of questionable authorship or in various stages of completion one is willing to include in the official oeuvre. (In fact, it has been some time since I’ve heard the old familiar slight that his popularity in France during the 19th century was perhaps due to his writing gaining something of substance from Charles Baudelaire’s translations.) While perhaps not quite as dramatically prescient in new utterance, form or philosophical depth as Walt Whitman or Emily Dickinson, he certainly was as wise an observer of human nature, and equally brilliant at capturing the psychological nuances of passionate feeling and the frustrating process of understanding human experience. He also had an exquisite ear for language which has made his poems some of the most enjoyable to memorize and recite of all those in English-language verse: “The Raven” and “Annabelle Lee” immediately spring to mind, as does “The Bells,” once beautifully put to music by the American folk singer, Phil Ochs, to offer an example of the breadth of Poe’s influence and the joy with which generations of readers embrace his poems. And to be sure, beyond the varying critical estimation of his output, there is no questioning his popularity. How many 19th century writers get such unique accolades as the naming of a professional sport franchise’s mascot, or their very own bobble head, after all? And in that spirit I am delighted to offer these 75 selections as an official offering of his full poetic output for your personal assessment and, I am confidant, enjoyment.

Author: Edgar Allan Poe and Neil Azevedo

Rating: Rating: 4.50 / 5
924 reviews

Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (The Reader’s Library Book 8) by Edgar Allan Poe and Neil Azevedo

A complete collection of the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Poe was born on January 19th in Boston, Massachusetts in 1809, and died in his adopted home of Baltimore, Maryland on October 7th, 1849, making him the first American writer in this series.The critical estimation of Poe’s work has increased dramatically over the course of my lifetime, which has been satisfying to observe, as he was for me—as I believe for so many lovers of literature—an early favorite, particularly because of his verse, which is rich with sonic texture and gothic subject matter: insanity, darkness, ghosts, death, etc. It is also quite manageable to read in its entirety at 75 poems depending on how many of those of questionable authorship or in various stages of completion one is willing to include in the official oeuvre. (In fact, it has been some time since I’ve heard the old familiar slight that his popularity in France during the 19th century was perhaps due to his writing gaining something of substance from Charles Baudelaire’s translations.) While perhaps not quite as dramatically prescient in new utterance, form or philosophical depth as Walt Whitman or Emily Dickinson, he certainly was as wise an observer of human nature, and equally brilliant at capturing the psychological nuances of passionate feeling and the frustrating process of understanding human experience. He also had an exquisite ear for language which has made his poems some of the most enjoyable to memorize and recite of all those in English-language verse: “The Raven” and “Annabelle Lee” immediately spring to mind, as does “The Bells,” once beautifully put to music by the American folk singer, Phil Ochs, to offer an example of the breadth of Poe’s influence and the joy with which generations of readers embrace his poems. And to be sure, beyond the varying critical estimation of his output, there is no questioning his popularity. How many 19th century writers get such unique accolades as the naming of a professional sport franchise’s mascot, or their very own bobble head, after all? And in that spirit I am delighted to offer these 75 selections as an official offering of his full poetic output for your personal assessment and, I am confidant, enjoyment.

Author: Edgar Allan Poe and Neil Azevedo

Rating: Rating: 4.50 / 5
913 reviews

Hear Me Sing: Book I by Rivka Edery LCSW

Rivka Edery has found a new voice, that of a poet!  Her work with victims of great suffering has brought her to a new level of spiritual transformation, which she invites us to experience.  In her new book, Hear Me Sing: Book I, she completely embodies her identity as a spiritual healer and becomes a psalmist.  Her songs reach to guide our broken hearts.  They are songs of transforming the pain of unrequited love.  Rivka’s poems celebrate the heart that continues to be grateful for love after rejection, for love abiding in spite of the trauma of abandonment, a love that prevails through being forsaken, that survives the obliterating cruelty of solitude. She shows us how we are never alone, as whimsical healing partners emerge in the form of Rivka’s various crones, goddesses. trolls and monsters in a landscape glittering with wonders.  Hear Me Sing: Book I is a passionate recording of a beautiful heart that never stops singing and loving. There is mystery in how Rivka is able to give so much. Could it be that she allows herself to be so beloved by her God, that her spirit sings in giving that love back? Failed romantic love is the match that creates a painful fire in her soul, leading her through a spiritual journey, and building enough energy to move mountains. The pain of this poet is not that of a victim asking for mercy, but the seizing of archetypal adventure and relishing a full, joyful emotional life.

Author: Rivka Edery LCSW

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
52 reviews