Me and Sal Paradise by Charles Rammelkamp

Ah, youth! Charles Rammelkamp’s ME AND SAL PARADISE is a poetic tale of the hitchhiking adventures of a young man in his early twenties. It’s the early 1970s, when Jack Kerouac’s influenced America’s youth with his romantic tales of cross-country adventures by car. One sequence of poems illuminates a 1971 hitchhiking adventure from the Midwest to Montreal and back, a pair of friends crossing Canada and New York state. Another sequence relates the solo adventures the following summer, also originating in the Midwest, of the author who this time heads to San Francisco, where his twin brother is living in the famed Haight-Asbury district. Through these journeys, we contemplate with the narrator the meanings of youth, friendship, and inevitably personal destiny.

Author: Charles Rammelkamp

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Blossoming Bones by Décio Coelho

Be careful as you approach the garden of spinal thorns: some of the flowers and bones are too fragile and too helpless, others are spiky and unbent. They can sting or heal you. The same applies to words. Some of them will soothe you, make you feel loose, and some may hurt you, like an unavoidable truth you never wanted to hear. But in the end, you will know that it was all needed, so you could grow into the beautifully-ornamented skeleton you support, flourished and blossomed. With spikes and all.This is an autopsy of the heart and the soul of the young.

Author: Décio Coelho

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Insomniacs, We by J. Andrew Schrecker

Insomniacs compose grocery lists and manifestos, a phoenix lies charred in its own ashes, and shadows hide in corners, afraid of themselves. In this decade-spanning volume of poetry, J. Andrew Schrecker blends surrealism, observation, and personal confession to paint a portrait of heartache and longing in recession-torn America.

Author: J. Andrew Schrecker

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Complete Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (The Reader’s Library Book 8) by Edgar Allan Poe

A complete collection of the poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Poe was born on January 19th in Boston, Massachusetts in 1809, and died in his adopted home of Baltimore, Maryland on October 7th, 1849, making him the first American writer in this series.The critical estimation of Poe’s work has increased dramatically over the course of my lifetime, which has been satisfying to observe, as he was for me—as I believe for so many lovers of literature—an early favorite, particularly because of his verse, which is rich with sonic texture and gothic subject matter: insanity, darkness, ghosts, death, etc. It is also quite manageable to read in its entirety at 75 poems depending on how many of those of questionable authorship or in various stages of completion one is willing to include in the official oeuvre. (In fact, it has been some time since I’ve heard the old familiar slight that his popularity in France during the 19th century was perhaps due to his writing gaining something of substance from Charles Baudelaire’s translations.) While perhaps not quite as dramatically prescient in new utterance, form or philosophical depth as Walt Whitman or Emily Dickinson, he certainly was as wise an observer of human nature, and equally brilliant at capturing the psychological nuances of passionate feeling and the frustrating process of understanding human experience. He also had an exquisite ear for language which has made his poems some of the most enjoyable to memorize and recite of all those in English-language verse: “The Raven” and “Annabelle Lee” immediately spring to mind, as does “The Bells,” once beautifully put to music by the American folk singer, Phil Ochs, to offer an example of the breadth of Poe’s influence and the joy with which generations of readers embrace his poems. And to be sure, beyond the varying critical estimation of his output, there is no questioning his popularity. How many 19th century writers get such unique accolades as the naming of a professional sport franchise’s mascot, or their very own bobble head, after all? And in that spirit I am delighted to offer these 75 selections as an official offering of his full poetic output for your personal assessment and, I am confidant, enjoyment.

Author: Edgar Allan Poe

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Poeticolors: Kaleidoscope by Dwayne Gray

A book of carefully woven words inspired by most of our human emotions and some of the most common experiences that aims directly at relating to the many emotions we experience daily. In this Callaloo/ mixture of poems you are bound to find yourself. Find yourself, your surfaced emotions in “Poeticolors”, and know that you are not alone in any emotion, good or bad, happy or sad.

Author: Dwayne Gray

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Light After The Darkness by D. R. Nguyen

“The Light after the Darkness,” is a journey through the highs and lows that life has to offer using poetry and prose. The book is divided into five chapters, with each chapter telling a different story from the most difficult moments in life to love and inspiration. This book is for anyone who’s ever felt pain, if you ever experience loss, if you ever felt love, this book is for you.

Author: D. R. Nguyen

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews