Brave New Universe: One Man’s View of All That Is by Paul J. Salvatore

In Brave New Universe – One Man’s View of All That Is, Paul J. Salvatore shares an insightful compilation of inspirational prose, quotes, and poetry in this memoir of personal enlightenment. The book takes the reader on a journey through his very “normal” upbringing in a conservative, Catholic, middle-class family on Long Island and explores how his perspective changed radically as he was introduced to different people and schools of thought during his late teen years and, later, while serving in the government sector. He expresses his views on some very emotional topics, such as philosophy, religion, politics, mortality, social issues, and his experiences with indigenous cultures and the natural world, all of which inspired him to compose poems and write about his experiences.Along his life journey, Salvatore also developed a strong interest in seeking a higher truth and developing a comprehensive view of “all that is” and to share the wisdom he gained in hopes of raising the hearts and minds of humanity. He sends out a message of hope and unity to people of all faiths and nationalities and prompts us all to understand that we share a lot more with each other than we may think. The author also describes how he was influenced, in part, by philosopher and author Aldous Huxley and his literary works, including Brave New World, written in 1932. He warns how we might be heading in the direction of the dystopic society described in Huxley’s book, if we don’t change our ways and heed warnings from the lessons of history. Brave New Universe stimulates the range of human passions and is a relevant and inspiring must-read for today’s world.

Author: Paul J. Salvatore

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

OCCULT MAGIC Decaffeinated: Pagan, Alchemy, Christian, Kabbalah, Hermetic + Other Occult Terminology For Reference And Use In Praxis: REVISED *Hype Not … #777 (The Tehuti Manuscripts MS Book 5) by Frater R.C.

The following is a simple guide to an otherwise complex thing: magic. It should not be considered as complete in any way, only comprehensive. The following pages contain information on the two kinds of magic, namely, theurgy and thaumaturgy. As will be seen, any true mastery of magic can only be gained at the hands of a skilled instructor or a magical Order. Ideally, both. – VH Frater RC, Konx Om Pax, Belfast 2009 (OTO Oasis Lecture)

Author: Frater R.C.

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Brave New Universe: One Man’s View of All That Is by Paul J. Salvatore

In Brave New Universe – One Man’s View of All That Is, Paul J. Salvatore shares an insightful compilation of inspirational prose, quotes, and poetry in this memoir of personal enlightenment. The book takes the reader on a journey through his very “normal” upbringing in a conservative, Catholic, middle-class family on Long Island and explores how his perspective changed radically as he was introduced to different people and schools of thought during his late teen years and, later, while serving in the government sector. He expresses his views on some very emotional topics, such as philosophy, religion, politics, mortality, social issues, and his experiences with indigenous cultures and the natural world, all of which inspired him to compose poems and write about his experiences.Along his life journey, Salvatore also developed a strong interest in seeking a higher truth and developing a comprehensive view of “all that is” and to share the wisdom he gained in hopes of raising the hearts and minds of humanity. He sends out a message of hope and unity to people of all faiths and nationalities and prompts us all to understand that we share a lot more with each other than we may think. The author also describes how he was influenced, in part, by philosopher and author Aldous Huxley and his literary works, including Brave New World, written in 1932. He warns how we might be heading in the direction of the dystopic society described in Huxley’s book, if we don’t change our ways and heed warnings from the lessons of history. Brave New Universe stimulates the range of human passions and is a relevant and inspiring must-read for today’s world.

Author: Paul J. Salvatore

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Science, Religion and Mysticism: What Great Physicists Say by Michael Green

This book is a collection of the finest mystical writings of the great physicists of the 20th Century. They are Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrödinger, Wolfgang Pauli, James Jeans, Arthur Eddington, Eugene Wigner, David Bohm, and Freeman Dyson. The essays are written in nontechnical language and will be of absorbing interest to a wide range of readers. 

Science enhances the moral values of life because it furthers a love of truth and reverence—love of truth displaying itself in the constant endeavor to arrive at a more exact knowledge of the world of mind and matter around us, and reverence, because every advance in knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our own being. — Max Planck

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. It was the experience of mystery–even if mixed with fear–that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms–it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. — Albert Einstein

Religion uses language in quite a different way from science; it is more closely related to the language of poetry. True we are inclined to think that science deals with information about objective facts, and poetry with subjective feelings… The fact that religions through the ages have spoken in images, parables and paradoxes means simply that there are no other ways of grasping the reality to which they refer. But that does not mean that it is not a genuine reality. And splitting this reality into objective and subjective sides won’t get us very far. That is why I consider those developments in physics during the last decades, which have shown how problematic such conceptions as ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’, are a great liberation of thought. — Niels Bohr

At one extreme is the idea of an objective world, pursuing its regular course in space and time, independently of any kind of observing subject; this has been the guiding image of modern science. At the other extreme is the idea of a subject, mystically experiencing the unity of the world and no longer confronted by an object or by any objective world; this has been the guiding image of Asian mysticism. Our thinking moves somewhere in the middle, between these two limiting conceptions; we should maintain the tension resulting from these two opposites. — Werner Heisenberg

The scientific picture of the real world around me is very deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart and that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. — Erwin Schrödinger

From an inner center, the mind seems to move outward in a sort of extraversion into the physical world, in which all happenings are assumed to be automatic, so that the spirit serenely encompasses this physical world, as it were, with its Ideas… This mysticism is so lucid that it sees out beyond many obscurities, which we moderns dare not and cannot do. — Wolfgang Pauli

Author: Michael Green

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Tracks We Leave by Jack King

The Tracks We Leave is a collection of proverbs and profound expressions attributed to North American Indian tribes. It reflects the beauty of a centuries-old journey that springs from a brave, undeniably urgent human struggle to preserve culture, language, identity, and way of life, a mighty endeavor that endures even unto this day.

Author: Jack King

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

OCCULT MAGIC: Invocation of Azrael: Angel of Death Prayer & Meditation (YOGA OF THE WEST: Rosicrucian Anthroposophy & Hermetic Kabbalah Book 1) by Frater R.C.

Based on traditional alchemical formula, the Invocation of Azrael.93/120

Author: Frater R.C.

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Science, Religion and Mysticism: What Great Physicists Say by Michael Green

This book is a collection of the finest mystical writings of the great physicists of the 20th Century. They are Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrödinger, Wolfgang Pauli, James Jeans, Arthur Eddington, Eugene Wigner, David Bohm, and Freeman Dyson. The essays are written in nontechnical language and will be of absorbing interest to a wide range of readers. 

Science enhances the moral values of life because it furthers a love of truth and reverence—love of truth displaying itself in the constant endeavor to arrive at a more exact knowledge of the world of mind and matter around us, and reverence, because every advance in knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our own being. — Max Planck

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. It was the experience of mystery–even if mixed with fear–that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms–it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. — Albert Einstein

Religion uses language in quite a different way from science; it is more closely related to the language of poetry. True we are inclined to think that science deals with information about objective facts, and poetry with subjective feelings… The fact that religions through the ages have spoken in images, parables and paradoxes means simply that there are no other ways of grasping the reality to which they refer. But that does not mean that it is not a genuine reality. And splitting this reality into objective and subjective sides won’t get us very far. That is why I consider those developments in physics during the last decades, which have shown how problematic such conceptions as ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’, are a great liberation of thought. — Niels Bohr

At one extreme is the idea of an objective world, pursuing its regular course in space and time, independently of any kind of observing subject; this has been the guiding image of modern science. At the other extreme is the idea of a subject, mystically experiencing the unity of the world and no longer confronted by an object or by any objective world; this has been the guiding image of Asian mysticism. Our thinking moves somewhere in the middle, between these two limiting conceptions; we should maintain the tension resulting from these two opposites. — Werner Heisenberg

The scientific picture of the real world around me is very deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart and that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. — Erwin Schrödinger

From an inner center, the mind seems to move outward in a sort of extraversion into the physical world, in which all happenings are assumed to be automatic, so that the spirit serenely encompasses this physical world, as it were, with its Ideas… This mysticism is so lucid that it sees out beyond many obscurities, which we moderns dare not and cannot do. — Wolfgang Pauli

Author: Michael Green

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Tracks We Leave by Jack King

The Tracks We Leave is a collection of proverbs and profound expressions attributed to North American Indian tribes. It reflects the beauty of a centuries-old journey that springs from a brave, undeniably urgent human struggle to preserve culture, language, identity, and way of life, a mighty endeavor that endures even unto this day.

Author: Jack King

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

OCCULT MAGIC: Invocation of Azrael: Angel of Death Prayer & Meditation (YOGA OF THE WEST: Rosicrucian Anthroposophy & Hermetic Kabbalah Book 1) by Frater R.C.

Based on traditional alchemical formula, the Invocation of Azrael.93/120

Author: Frater R.C.

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Science, Religion and Mysticism: What Great Physicists Say by Michael Green

This book is a collection of the finest mystical writings of the great physicists of the 20th Century. They are Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrödinger, Wolfgang Pauli, James Jeans, Arthur Eddington, Eugene Wigner, David Bohm, and Freeman Dyson. The essays are written in nontechnical language and will be of absorbing interest to a wide range of readers. 

Science enhances the moral values of life because it furthers a love of truth and reverence—love of truth displaying itself in the constant endeavor to arrive at a more exact knowledge of the world of mind and matter around us, and reverence, because every advance in knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our own being. — Max Planck

The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. It was the experience of mystery–even if mixed with fear–that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms–it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. — Albert Einstein

Religion uses language in quite a different way from science; it is more closely related to the language of poetry. True we are inclined to think that science deals with information about objective facts, and poetry with subjective feelings… The fact that religions through the ages have spoken in images, parables and paradoxes means simply that there are no other ways of grasping the reality to which they refer. But that does not mean that it is not a genuine reality. And splitting this reality into objective and subjective sides won’t get us very far. That is why I consider those developments in physics during the last decades, which have shown how problematic such conceptions as ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’, are a great liberation of thought. — Niels Bohr

At one extreme is the idea of an objective world, pursuing its regular course in space and time, independently of any kind of observing subject; this has been the guiding image of modern science. At the other extreme is the idea of a subject, mystically experiencing the unity of the world and no longer confronted by an object or by any objective world; this has been the guiding image of Asian mysticism. Our thinking moves somewhere in the middle, between these two limiting conceptions; we should maintain the tension resulting from these two opposites. — Werner Heisenberg

The scientific picture of the real world around me is very deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart and that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. — Erwin Schrödinger

From an inner center, the mind seems to move outward in a sort of extraversion into the physical world, in which all happenings are assumed to be automatic, so that the spirit serenely encompasses this physical world, as it were, with its Ideas… This mysticism is so lucid that it sees out beyond many obscurities, which we moderns dare not and cannot do. — Wolfgang Pauli

Author: Michael Green

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews