Around the World in 80 Recipes from the 1800s (The Flavor Fairy Collection Book 8) by Fae Merrie

In Jules Verne’s classic novel “Around the World in 80 Days” the unflappable Phileas Fogg set out to prove that he could do exactly what the title says—an almost impossible feat in 1872 when the story was first published. An airplane would have helped him tremendously, but they hadn’t been invented yet, so Phileas had to rely mainly on boats and trains to get around (plus an elephant at one point). He also had to eat, of course, but Verne didn’t offer many details on that score—he was writing an adventure tale after all, not a cookbook. Still, one has to wonder what a world traveler of the 19th century might have dined upon en route. Which is how this book came about. Here you’ll find an eclectic collection of 80 antique recipes from the time period in which Jules Verne lived and wrote. There are soups, salads, side dishes, entrees, and desserts. All are genuine vintage Victorian, yet easy to prepare, and all have an international flair.

Author: Fae Merrie

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945-1980 (Mental Health in Historical Perspective) by Alison Haggett

This book is open access under a CC BY license.Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Author: Alison Haggett

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

My Raging Case of Beastie Fever by Matt Burns

The year is 1987. A young Matt Burns is home sick from kindergarten. He’s tired of watching daytime cartoons like “Thunder Cats” and “Gummy Bears”. He makes sure his mom isn’t around…he sneakily switches the channel to MTV…and what he sees will change his life forever:It’s three rappers and they’re crashing some nerdy house party. These guys are rude and crude and, most strikingly, they’re…white? Wait-whaaa? Rappers? White?! This is strange. This is something Burns has never seen before. He’s fascinated and can’t look away. In fact, he pretty much won’t look away for about 30 years…When you look up “Beastie Boys super-fan” in the dictionary (it’s in there, trust me), you will find a picture of Matt Burns. Over the years, he has performed both “Sure Shot” and “Pass the Mic” in his middle school talent shows, written all his college application essays on the Beastie Boys and made a point to wear a Beastie Boys T-shirt every single day of his senior year in high school. This latter feat may have actually been a world record, though it was never officially acknowledged by Guinness (it’s all politics – you know how it is).From the writer who brought you “Jungle F’ng Fever: My 30-Year Love Affair with Guns N’ Roses” (now on Amazon), this new and hilarious fan memoir is essential reading for any true Beasties fan out there. This is a story about Matt Burns’ love of the Beastie Boys. This is a story about his raging case of Beastie Fever.

Author: Matt Burns

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Broken Voices: Postcolonial Entanglements and the Preservation of Korea’s Central Folksong Traditions (Music and Performing Arts of Asia and the Pacific) by Roald Maliangkay

Broken Voices is the first English-language book on Korea’s rich folksong heritage, and the first major study of the effects of Japanese colonialism on the intangible heritage of its former colony. Folksongs and other music traditions continue to be prominent in South Korea, which today is better known for its technological prowess and the Korean Wave of popular entertainment. In 2009, many Koreans reacted with dismay when China officially recognized the folksong Arirang, commonly regarded as the national folksong in North and South Korea, as part of its national intangible cultural heritage. They were vindicated when versions from both sides of the DMZ were included in UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity a few years later. At least on a national level, folksongs thus carry significant political importance. But what are these Korean folksongs about, and who has passed them on over the years, and how? Broken Voices describes how the major repertoires were transmitted and performed in and around Seoul. It sheds light on the training and performance of professional entertainment groups and singers, including kisaeng, the entertainment girls often described as Korean geisha. Personal stories of noted singers describe how the colonial period, the media, the Korean War, and personal networks have affected work opportunities and the standardization of genres.As the object of resentment (and competition) and a source of creative inspiration, the image of Japan has long affected the way in which Koreans interpret their own culture. Roald Maliangkay describes how an elaborate system of heritage management was first established in modern Korea and for what purposes. His analysis uncovers that folksong traditions have changed significantly since their official designation; one major change being gender representation and its effect on sound and performance. Ultimately, Broken Voices raises an important issue of cultural preservation—traditions that fail to attract practitioners and audiences are unsustainable, so compromises may be unwelcome, but imperative.

Author: Roald Maliangkay

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

806; His Name Was Walter by Margaret Ann Hoffman Bonnie Sue Gordon

Historical tale of a coal mining family in the early 1900’s. The story opens in 1914 and runs through 1930. The authors of the book started out looking for some family history and discovered their family’s voice. The book follows a young family from coal patch to coal patch. After five children and just about as many coal towns they settled in an idyllic coal town. It was far more family and safety friendly than the other coal mining towns of that day. This story includes trials and tribulations of working in the coal industry, an accusation and a trial. The book comes to a close two years after one of the largest mining accidents in the history of the United States.

Author: Margaret Ann Hoffman Bonnie Sue Gordon

Rating: Rating: 4.60 / 5
5 reviews

Ottoman Art of War: Power Tactics & Strategy For Today by Steffan Ileman

They came on horseback from Central Asia and went on to grow one of the longest-lasting empires in history. They established history’s first multicultural state centuries before British colonies in North America declared the United States of America. They had superior military and organizational skills that ended the Medieval Age in Europe and set the stage for the Renaissance and the Age of Reason as the power of feudal lords eroded under their big guns. Their legendary elite combat core, the Janissaries, was a phenomenon in transformative education.

Ottoman Empire was Europe’s first welfare state based on privately funded charities. The Empire’s trade pact with France was history’s first free trade agreement. Like the United States the Ottoman Empire attracted talent, know-how and capital from all over to what was the world’s biggest free trade zone.

Can the tactics and strategy Ottoman Turks used to grow their Empire be applied to today’s entrepreneurial and organizational challenges?

As Islam and its history are uppermost on minds and the news agenda today, this is a fresh perspective on the people that used to be Islam’s shield throughout centuries. This is a book about history, but not a history book. It’s a businessman’s distillation of historical events into tactics and strategy that could be applied to 21st century challenges.

Author: Steffan Ileman

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945-1980 (Mental Health in Historical Perspective) by Alison Haggett

This book is open access under a CC BY license.Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Author: Alison Haggett

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews