Everlasting Light – A Civil War Romance by Andrea Boeshaar

When loss lingers … love – even beyond death.

The American Civil War has ended, but Alaina McKenna still awaits news about her husband, Braeden. Did he die in a Yankee prison? Was he buried in a shallow grave on a Virginia battlefield? Or has he turned his back on the specter of death and loss around him and sought solitude west of the Mississippi River, never to return home, again?

As Christmas nears, Alaina deflects the advances of a suitor in the neighboring county, choosing to cling instead to hope and her belief that Braeden will return. As winter’s chill settles upon her farm, Alaina cries out to God in one final Christmas Prayer.

When loss lingers … love – even beyond death. For it is through heartbreak that God opens doorways to hope.

Author: Andrea Boeshaar

Rating: Rating: 4.30 / 5
94 reviews

Abraham Lincoln: A Concise History of the Man Who Transformed the World (Biographies of US Presidents Book 16) by Hourly History

Abraham Lincoln
As president, Abraham Lincoln had one goal and that was to preserve the Union at all costs. His determination to hold the North and South together would ultimately lead to the bloodiest war in American history, the abolition of slavery, and his own untimely death from an assassin’s bullet. But to see Lincoln solely as a tragic figure consumed with the strife of mid-nineteenth century America is to miss meeting him as a man who never allowed himself to be defeated by adversity or grief or turmoil. From his earliest days on the frontier, he endured the loss of his beloved mother and the demanding physical challenges of a rough-and-ready land where death came easily and education was rare; where ambition was rewarded if a man proved himself willing to work hard; where love was attainable, even for a man whose physical appearance was most charitably described as homely.

Inside you will read about…
✓ Born on the Frontier
✓ Lincoln’s Life in New Salem
✓ The Election of 1860
✓ The House Divides
✓ The Tide Turns
✓ The End
✓ The Legacy of Lincoln

Lincoln arose from poverty and ignorance to become a man of influence and eloquence whose speeches continue to resonate with a nation that aspires to meet his ideals. Lincoln had his detractors and enemies but throughout his years, he had a remarkable ability to remain unpoisoned by his foes and to retain compassion for those who opposed him. Meet Abraham Lincoln, the frontier president whose death made him a martyr but whose life made him a hero.

Author: Hourly History

Rating: Rating: 4.50 / 5
149 reviews

Catch a Falling Star (The Shooting Stars Series Book 1) by Leah Downing

As a very complicated couple makes it to the red carpets of Hollywood, devisive forces continually try to tear them apart. Almost a year after federal investigator Lauren St. Germain was exonerated from charges of assisting in a homeland terrorist attack, doubts still exist with regards to her innocence. In order to move on from her highly publicized trial, she accepts the position as a Hollywood “Yoga Trainer” for a hugely successful company owned by her closest confidant from college. While navigating her way through the glamorous (but often snarky) yoga scene, Lauren catches the eye of an up and coming film star, James Bayer.

After a steamy night together on a luxury cruise off the coast of Canada, they impulsively embark on a rugged journey through the icy Inuit Tundra guided by a tribal dog sledding outfit. It is there, under the prophetic Northern Lights, that Lauren discovers she is the target of a dark supernatural threat with global implications. SEQUEL IN FALL 2016.

Author: Leah Downing

Rating: Rating: 4.70 / 5
59 reviews

Olivia, Mourning (The Olivia Series Book 1) by Yael Politis

Book 1 of the Olivia Series “Historical fiction at its best” — D.Donovan, Senior eBook Reviewer, Midwest Book Review
The Olivia series consists of:
Book 1 – Olivia, Mourning (Historical – 1840s)
Book 2 – The Way the World Is (Historical – 1840s)
Book 3 – Whatever Happened to Mourning Free? (Vintage Contemporary -1967 and Historical – 1840s)
The Historical Novel Society has selected Olivia, Mourning as one of its seven Editors’ Choice historical novels and nominated it for the 2015 HNS Indie Award.

Book Description
Olivia wants the 80 acres in far off Michigan that her father left to whichever of his offspring wants to stake a claim. As Olivia says, “I’m sprung off him just as much as Avis or Tobey.”
The problem: she’s seventeen, female, and it’s 1841.
Mourning Free knows how to run a farm and Olivia has complete trust in him.
The problem: he’s the orphaned son of runaway slaves and reluctant to travel and work with a white girl. He especially fears the slave catchers who patrol the free states, hunting fugitive slaves.
Not without qualms, they set off together. All goes well, despite the drudgery of survival in an isolated log cabin. Incapable of acknowledging her feelings for Mourning, Olivia thinks her biggest problem is her unrequited romantic interest in their young, single neighbor.
Then her world falls apart.
Strong-willed, vulnerable, and compassionate, Olivia is a compelling protagonist on a journey to find a way to do the right thing in a world in which so much is wrong.

About the Author
Yael Politis grew up in Dearborn, Michigan, not far from Olivia’s farm. She spent years researching the backdrop for Olivia’s story, enjoying the challenge of recreating daily life in another time and place. She based many of the details (including how Mourning got his name) on letters and journals passed down through her family, over seven generations of lives lived in the American Midwest. She received a great deal of insight from her sister Martha, who lived in a modern log home, hunted her own land, and was as independent and stubborn as Olivia.
After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Politis moved to Israel, where she has worked as an agricultural laborer, secretary, librarian, Administrative Systems Analyst, Hebrew-English translator, editor, English teacher, technical writer, and proposal writer.

Author: Yael Politis

Rating: Rating: 4.40 / 5
982 reviews

An American Holocaust: The Story of Lataine’s Ring by Kerry Barger

75 years ago on March 18, 1937 around 3:17 pm, one of the most modern public school buildings in America exploded in a rural Texas community decimating the student population and destroying innocent lives. Considered the worst public school disaster in American history, controversial theories surrounding this tragedy are still debated to this day. The event sparked changes that soon reverberated around the world and continue to affect each of us in our homes, schools, businesses and places of worship. “An American Holocaust” is a story that begins with the giving of a child’s Christmas gift in 1936. The explosion took place at the London School in New London, Texas in 1937. The story relays more than simple facts. It is a personal account of unprepared loss and shattered dreams, followed by unfathomable grief. It describes the feelings of those who died in their innocence and of those who witnessed horror and lived through the aftermath. An unresolved silence persisted for forty years among the entire community of scarred survivors. For those who spoke out, their stories have been told and re-told for three quarters of a century, but most people have never heard them. Although the innocent still suffer from the ignorance and indifference of a few, especially those we should be able to trust with the lives and safety of our children, this is also a story of hope. Countless lives have been saved by bold actions that were taken in the wake of this unanticipated sacrifice of so many children who were literally consumed by fire. It was truly an American holocaust. The following is an editorial review by John E. Roper, The US Review of Books: “I remember being thrown up in the air like a toy… I keep turning and spinning. Then darkness.” The attack on the World Trade Center in New York claimed almost 3,000 lives and changed America forever. A little-remembered explosion of a school in the 1930s resulted in just over 300 deaths, yet it, too, had a tremendous impact on society. Barger revives the story of one of the nation’s most poignant tragedies in his highly-moving tale. The school in New London was considered one of the most modern facilities in the state for the time period, and the residents of the small East Texas town were extremely proud of it. Like in many of the small towns near the oil fields, school officials had decided to tap into the natural gas lines to cut heating costs at the facility. What they never realized was just how dangerous that practice could be. On March 18, 1937, a spark in the wood shop ignited the cloud of invisible and odorless gas that had slowly permeated the school. The resulting explosion killed children and teachers alike, littering the area with body parts and completely devastating a community. The catastrophe led Texas to mandate the inclusion of an additive to natural gas that would enable people to smell it. The nation and then much of the world soon followed suit. Barger’s book follows the lives of several families affected by the tragedy, including his own. By giving the reader glimpses into the hopes and dreams of individuals like his cousin, Lataine, he builds a literary memorial to those who lost so much to make others safe in the future… it stands as a much-needed reminder of an event that should never be forgotten.

Author: Kerry Barger

Rating: Rating: 4.50 / 5
90 reviews

The Liberation of Ravenna Morton by Suzanne Jenkins

Ravenna Morton is an American Indian woman living a very old-fashioned life in a primitive cabin at the edge of the Kalamazoo River. Facing modern problems when her lifelong affair with a Greek artist is closely examined by their children after a child she gave up for adoption dies, The Liberation of Ravenna Morton captures the small-town dynamic of a family’s private secrets being exposed to the world. A poignant look at the melding of two Americanized cultures observed under a microscope.Adult content.

Author: Suzanne Jenkins

Rating: Rating: 4.20 / 5
163 reviews

Geronimo’s Story of His Life: As Told to S. M. Barrett by Geronimo and S. M. Barrett

A pivotal piece of nineteenth-century Native American history from a tireless warrior seeking justice for his people. Storied leader of the Bedonkohe band of the Chiricahua Apache tribe, Geronimo led resistance against Mexican and American troops seeking to drive the Apache from their land during the 1850s through the 1880s. In 1886, he finally surrendered to the US Army and became a prisoner of war. Although he would never return to his homeland, Geronimo became an iconic figure in Native American society and even had the honor of riding with President Theodore Roosevelt in his 1905 inaugural parade. That same year, he agreed to share his story with Stephen M. Barrett, a superintendent of education from Lawton, Oklahoma.   In Geronimo’s own words, this is his fascinating life story. Beginning with an Apache creation myth, he discusses his youth and family, the bloody conflicts between Mexico and the United States, and his two decades of life as a prisoner. Revered by his people and feared by his enemies, Geronimo narrates his memoir with a compassionate and compelling voice that still resonates today.    

Author: Geronimo and S. M. Barrett

Rating: Rating: 4.20 / 5
370 reviews

The Federalist Papers by John Jay

The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written and published anonymously in 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay exhorting voters to ratify the United States Constitution. The controversial arguments first presented here by three of America’s greatest patriots and political theorists are still hotly debated today.This new digital edition of The Federalist Papers includes a table of contents and an image gallery.

Author: John Jay

Rating: Rating: 4.50 / 5
1536 reviews