The American Civil War WAS About Slavery: A Quick Handbook of Quotes to Reference When Debating Those Who Would Argue Otherwise by Cody C. Engdahl

Are you tired of having to argue with people who say the American Civil War WASN’T about slavery? Are you ever frustrated that they came prepared to argue, but you didn’t? This is a very brief, easily navigated handbook of actual quotes from the people who were directly involved in the conflict. Let the Confederacy speak for themselves. They were very clear about their motives. Don’t let the “lost cause” myth muddy our true and important history.

Author: Cody C. Engdahl

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Baron of Beacon Hill: A biography of John Hancock by William M Fowler

John Hancock belongs to that nearly mythical assemblage, the Founding Fathers, and his bold signature across the Declaration of Independence has placed him among the most famous of that legendary group. Indeed, the very renown of his signature has tended to obscure his position as one of the most extraordinary politicians in American history.Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1737. When his father died in 1744 after a short illness, seven-year-old John was sent to live with his childless Uncle Thomas, a prosperous merchant in Boston. John attended Boston Latin School and later Harvard, where he was an indifferent student, and then joined his uncle as an apprentice in the world of commerce. At the age of twenty-seven, when his uncle passed away, he became one of the richest men in the American colonies.Boston was a town filled with men of political ambition, yet Hancock soon became the most prominent of them all. From his mansion atop Beacon Hill, he managed to dominate the politics of Boston and of Massachusetts for nearly thirty years.He was an active, if sometimes covert, participant in the events leading to the Revolution. And as President of the Second Continental Congress he knew, and was known by, all the important people of his day.The Baron of Beacon Hill is more than the biography of a great man. It also tells the story of eighteenth-century Boston and of the birth of the American republic. Vivid and immensely readable, it captures both the unique character of its subject and the excitement of his times.WILLIAM M. FOWLER, JR., received his Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame and is now Associate Professor of History at Northeastern University in Boston. In addition to his numerous articles for magazines and newspapers, he has written two other books—William Ellery: A Rhode Island Politico and Lord of Admiralty and Rebels Under Sail, a dramatic account of the American navy during the Revolution. He and his wife and daughter live in Reading, Massachusetts.

Author: William M Fowler

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Salem’s Theocracy: Shattered on the Rock of Witchcraft by Corinda Marsh

Little Dorcas Good was four years old when she was arrested for practicing witchcraft. She was chained in a dungeon jail, unable to walk about or see the light of day for months. Giles Corey was eighty years old when he was crushed to death for refusing to participate in the madness. Twenty innocent people died on Gallows Hill in Salem in 1692; more died in jail. Frightened girls accused men, women, and children of tormenting them through specters, ghosts, and witchcraft. The girls were spurred on by evil men who had hidden motives. All this was made possible by a Puritan Theocracy. Not until the theocracy smashed itself upon the rock did the tragedy end.

Author: Corinda Marsh

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A Soldier’s Diary 1893-1918: From Philadelphia to the Philippines,Crawfish Jesse Tells It Like It Was by Jesse Davisson

Digging into one’s family history can reveal unusual surprises. In my case, I recently discovered my great-grandfather, Jesse C. Davisson’s first-hand account of his 25-year military experience during an epic period in American history.Jesse was no angel when he first joined the Army in 1893 as an ordinary young man in Philadelphia. His diary follows his subsequent adventures––from learning to ride horse with the 7th Cavalry and befriending Indian Scouts to surviving ambushes and water-boarding prisoners––all while serving in the American Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection and World War I. A Soldier’s Diary 1893-1918: From Philadelphia to the Philippines, Crawfish Jesse Tells It Like It Was reveals the good and the bad in our human character. In fact, some of the descriptions of brutal killings and torture may not be suitable for some readers. But for many military history devotees and fans, WWI scholars and all those who study American history during this era, Jesse’s story will not only educate; it will reveal a sordid side of our country’s military history, which, up until now, has been either unknown or largely overlooked.“We all write through pain,” a relative told me upon reading Jesse’s diary, and I can say with certainty that this diary will take readers to many extraordinary places as it travels back in time to when this country was not a nation but a series of staked claims and territories. You will meet a motley crew of cattle rustlers, thieves, murderers, outlaws and deserters, as Jesse, himself, once became. Between his encounters in saloons with women of the night, Mexican banditos, Yaqui Indians and German machine guns, it is amazing that he was not injured or killed in action. Instead, Jesse eventually died as a result of chest problems he suffered while being gassed in France during WWI. Someone once said, “When a man dies, a library burns down.” I hope that by reviving the unknown story of my great-grandfather, you will also become fascinated with Jesse and this epic period of American history.

Author: Jesse Davisson

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Family Genealogy Queries: COOPER (Southern Genealogical Research) by R. Stephen Smith

The family information in this book comes from a genealogy magazine published during the 1990s, now out of print. Contents of this volume include all queries from the magazine mentioning individuals or families surnamed COOPER (60 queries total).The focus is on families in the southern United States.Genealogy queries such as these have long been a means for family researchers to share information. Although they were written by persons seeking information, the wealth of detail in them could prove valuable to you if you’re working on the same names or lines.Typically, queries include information on births, deaths, marriages, children of a given couple, family migrations, etc. Some trace several generations of one family. Some even include colorful family stories passed down through the years!Note: If you aren’t sure if the information in this book will be useful to your particular family research, why not borrow and read it for free with a Kindle Unlimited subscription?Other surnames occurring incidentally in the queries reproduced in this volume include ALLEN, ALTMAN, ANDERSON, ANDREWS, ANTHONY, ARMSTRONG, ARNOLD, ASCOUGH, ASTON, AUSTELL, AUSTIN, AVANT, BAILEY, BAKER, BARBER, BARNETT, BARR, BARROW, BATCHELOR, BATES, BAYES, BENTON, BERRYHILL, BIBLE, BILBO, BIRD, BLACKBURN, BLACKMORE, BLALOCK, BLANKENSHIP, BLEVINS, BLOUNT, BONNER, BORDEAUX, BRAKFIELD, BRANNON, BROGDEN, BROWN, BUGG, BULLARD, BUNN, BURCH, BURDETTE, BURTON, BUTLER, BUTTRAM, BYRD, CALDWELL, CANNIDA, CANNON, CARLYLE, CARPENTER, CASADY, CASSADY, CAUSEY, CHAMPION, CHANCY, CHAPMAN, CHAPPELL, CHENNOWITH, CLARK, CLINTON, COBB, COGGIN, COLVIN, COOK, COOKE, COSBY, CRESON, CROMARTIE, DANIELS, DARNABY, DASHNER, DAUTHTERY, DAVID, DAVIS, DEANS, DEDMAN, DENMAN, DEWEESE, DICKENS, DICKERSON, DICKSON, DILLARD, DIXON, DOANE, DOLLAR, DONELSON, DOUGLASS, DOZIER, DRUMMOND, DUFF, DUFFY, DUKE, DUKES, DUNCAN, DUNN, EATON, EAVES, EBLEN, EDWARDS, ELLIOTT, ELROD, ENNIS, EPPES, ESTES, EURE, FELDER, FERGSON, FERGUSON, FINCH, FINCHER, FLEMING, FLETCHER, FORT, FREDERICK, FRIERSON, FURR, GANTT, GARLAND, GARMAN, GAYLE, GEIGER, GENTRY, GIDDEN, GILBERT, GISON, GLOVER, GOINS, GOLLIHAR, GORDY, GRANADE, GRANBERRY, GREEN, GREENE, GRIGGS, GUINN, GUNN, HALL, HAMILTON, HARDIN, HARPER, HARRIS, HASKINS, HATHAWAY, HAYES, HAYNES, HAYS, HEFFERMAN, HEFLIN, HEMBREE, HEMPHILL, HENDERSON, HENDRIX, HENDRY, HENNINGTON, HENRY, HERRINGTON, HIATT, HIGGS, HIGH, HIGHT, HINTON, HODGE, HODGES, HOGAN, HOLLEMAN, HOLLEY, HOOKS, HOPKINS, HORN, HOUGH, HUGHES, HUNNEL, HUNT, HYATT, INGO, INNES, IVES, JACKSON, JARRELL, JENKINS, JOHNSON, JONES, JORDAN, KEELING, KELLEY, KENNADY, KENNEDY, KING, LAMB, LAMBERT, LAMM, LEE, LETT, LEWIS, LILLINGTON, LINDSEY, LONGMIRE, LOPER, LYNDE, MALONE, MARK, MARTIN, MASON, MATHEWS, MATHIS, MAXWELL, McCLAIN, McCLENDON, McCLUSKY, McCOWAN, McCOY, McKINZIE, McNEILL, McPHAUL, McRAE, MEW, MINTON, MISKELLEY, MITCHELL, MONROE, MONTGOMERY, MONZELY, MORRIS, MOSS, MULLEN, MULLINS, MURPHY, NAPIER, NELSON, NESOME, NETTLES, NEWSOME, NUNN, NUTT, OLIVER, OTIS, OVERTON, PARKER, PARSONS, PATTON, PEARSON, PENDERGRASS, PERRY, PEVEY, PHILLIPS, PIERCE, PIERSON, PINKSTON, POOLE, POSEY, POWEL, POWELL, PREWETT, PRYOR, RAINEY, RAINWATER, RATCLIFF, RAY, RAYNOR, REARDEN, REAVES, REEVES, REID, RENFROW, RHEA, RICKS, RIDDLE, ROBERTS, ROBERTSON, RODGERS, ROSS, ROUGHTON, RUSHING, SAMPLE, SANDERS, SANDERSON, SANSOM, SCOTT, SELLERS, SEMPLE, SHENAULT, SILLARS, SILLERS, SIMMONS, SIMONTON, SMITH, SNELLING, SOLOMAN, SPEARS, SPEER, SPIER, SPIERS, STAPLES, STEELMAN, STEPHENS, STEPP, STEVENS, STILL, STOCKMAN, STOUGHTON, STRAHAN, STRIBLING, STRICKLAND, SUTTON, SWANN, SWITZER, SWORDS, SYDNOR, TALBERT, TANNER, TARLETON, TEMPLE, THOMPSON, THORNTON, TILLEY, TILSON, TINSLEY, TOOLE, TOWNSEND, TURNER, TYLLY, VAIL, VALENTINE, VINSON, WALKER, WALLER, WATTS, WEAVER, WEBB, WEEKS, WELLS, WHATLEY, WHEELUS, WHITE, WILKERSON, WILLIAMS, WILSON, WINFREY, WINNINGHAM, WOOD, WOODS, WORKS, WORTHEN, WRIGHT, YANCEY, YARBOROUGH, YARBROUGH, YOUNGBLOOD, and ZACHARY.

Author: R. Stephen Smith

There Were No Cats in America: “An American Tail” Enters Trump’s America by Adam M. DeSimone

Using the 1986 animated film “An American Tail” as a framing device, this work explores the immigrant experience of émigrés who lived in the United States during the Gilded Age. While the film itself celebrates the arrival of the furry, lovable, Mousekewitz family to the U.S., this essay comments on the evolution of U.S. immigration policy from the late 19th to early 21st centuries, with special attention paid to the National Origins Act, the Chinese Exclusion Act, and to President Trump’s 2017 “Muslim bans.” Major push and pull factors associated with immigration are examined as well; a comparison between the socioeconomic conditions of the Gilded Age and modern era follow. In this essay, the author argues that the Trump administration’s views on immigration are similar to those of the 19th century’s exclusionary Nativists and their supporters. The author shows that all of this essay’s highlighted immigration policies are steeped in xenophobia, are intentionally designed not to solve the problems lawmakers claim they address, and are antithetical to the values that the U.S.—a nation of immigrants—claims as a deep part of its identity. In “An American Tail,” the film’s main heel, Warren T. Rat, tries to convince the marginalized mice-inhabitants of his world that one of his lies is truthful. Even as his story conspicuously unwinds around him, he reasserts himself by asking, “Who are you going to believe? Me, or your own eyes?” After reading this essay, the author hopes you will be able to trust your own eyes. You will be equipped with enough historic knowledge and context to think critically about President Trump’s rhetoric on immigration and refugees, decide if this is something you wish to resist, and do so while still trusting in the basic goodness of the American people, the majority of whom did not vote for Trump in the 2016 presidential election. The author intends this essay to be a small, personal contribution to today’s dialogue on immigration in America.

Author: Adam M. DeSimone

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

Gun Wages by Alan David

Crick Bender’s father never agreed with guns. Crick Bender’s father was a good man. But everything changed when he was shot dead whilst holding an empty shotgun.Crick had his revenge, but it wasn’t enough. He’s on a mission to clean up any town that will pay him and this time that town is Juniper Creek – where Jake Riley and his gang have taken the place over.With no Sheriff around, Juniper Creek is under Riley’s thumb, but when Frank Miller calls Crick in, Riley’s days are soon to be numbered.Living under the alias Tom East, Crick sure picked a bad time to run into an old friend – let alone two of them.Bullets soon see to Shotgun Joe, but it’s another ghost from the past, Adabelle, who might bring more trouble.And then there’s Frank Miller’s daughter, Pearl.Crick falls instantly for the beautiful Pearl, but are their worlds too far apart for them to ever come together? Can Crick save the town, take down Jake Riley and get the girl?It’s looking less likely by the day. Praise for Alan David’A classic of the genre.’ – Tom Kasey, bestselling author of Trade Off.Alan David is a prolific writer of over 500 novels in a wide range of genres, from classic westerns, to historical thrillers. Pioneering Press is an imprint of Endeavour Press, the UK’s leading independent digital publisher. We publish new and classic westerns by authors from the US and the UK.Follow us on Twitter: @PioneeringPressGoodreads: www.goodreads.com/PioneeringPress

Author: Alan David

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

The Baron of Beacon Hill: A biography of John Hancock by William M Fowler

John Hancock belongs to that nearly mythical assemblage, the Founding Fathers, and his bold signature across the Declaration of Independence has placed him among the most famous of that legendary group. Indeed, the very renown of his signature has tended to obscure his position as one of the most extraordinary politicians in American history.Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1737. When his father died in 1744 after a short illness, seven-year-old John was sent to live with his childless Uncle Thomas, a prosperous merchant in Boston. John attended Boston Latin School and later Harvard, where he was an indifferent student, and then joined his uncle as an apprentice in the world of commerce. At the age of twenty-seven, when his uncle passed away, he became one of the richest men in the American colonies.Boston was a town filled with men of political ambition, yet Hancock soon became the most prominent of them all. From his mansion atop Beacon Hill, he managed to dominate the politics of Boston and of Massachusetts for nearly thirty years.He was an active, if sometimes covert, participant in the events leading to the Revolution. And as President of the Second Continental Congress he knew, and was known by, all the important people of his day.The Baron of Beacon Hill is more than the biography of a great man. It also tells the story of eighteenth-century Boston and of the birth of the American republic. Vivid and immensely readable, it captures both the unique character of its subject and the excitement of his times.WILLIAM M. FOWLER, JR., received his Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame and is now Associate Professor of History at Northeastern University in Boston. In addition to his numerous articles for magazines and newspapers, he has written two other books—William Ellery: A Rhode Island Politico and Lord of Admiralty and Rebels Under Sail, a dramatic account of the American navy during the Revolution. He and his wife and daughter live in Reading, Massachusetts.

Author: William M Fowler

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews

A Slave Mother’s True Story: Aunt Rachel’s Miraculous Escape by Julie McDonald

This is the true story,  (10 minute read time) of a slave named Rachel.  Rachel had escaped once before and when her owner captured her, he took drastic measures to make sure she would not escaped again!  A leg iron, with a heavy ball and chain was clamped just above her ankle.  Handcuffs were put on her wrists. She was loaded onto a wagon and bound once again for a life of slavery.  The situation looked hopeless.   As the title indicates, this heartwarming story of Rachel is simply miraculous.

Author: Julie McDonald

Rating: Rating: 5.00 / 5
5 reviews