Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Wisehouse Classics Edition) by Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was born in slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey near Easton in Talbot County, Maryland. He was not sure of the exact year of his birth, but he knew that it was 1817 or 1818. As a young boy he was sent to Baltimore, to be a house servant, where he learned to read and write, with the assistance of his master’s wife. In 1838 he escaped from slavery and went to New York City, where he married Anna Murray, a free colored woman whom he had met in Baltimore. Soon thereafter he changed his name to Frederick Douglass. In 1841 he addressed a convention of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in Nantucket and so greatly impressed the group that they immediately employed him as an agent. He was such an impressive orator that numerous persons doubted if he had ever been a slave, so he wrote NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS. During the Civil War he assisted in the recruiting of colored men for the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments and consistently argued for the emancipation of slaves. After the war he was active in securing and protecting the rights of the freemen. In his later years, at different times, he was secretary of the Santo Domingo Commission, Marshall and recorder of deeds of the District of Columbia, and United States Minister to Haiti. His other autobiographical works are MY BONDAGE AND MY FREEDOM and LIFE AND TIMES OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, published in 1855 and 1881 respectively. He died in 1895.

Author: Frederick Douglass

Rating: Rating: 4.80 / 5
112 reviews

Hitler on Trial: Alan Cranston, Mein Kampf, and The Court of World Opinion by Lorraine Tong

Before the Internet, Pursuing the Truth about Adolf Hitler and Mein Kampf In 1939, a 24-year old American journalist, recently returned to New York City from Europe, discovers that Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf—as published in the United States—is sanitized. Using Hitler’s own words from the original Nazi manifesto, he translates and writes an annotated condensed edition to expose the full measure of Hitler’s evil ideology, chilling anti-Semitism, and plans for world domination. The American publisher of Mein Kampf sues for copyright infringement.  This short historical non-fiction book is about the people and events that shaped the young journalist’s life. It recounts his determined pursuit of the truth to alert Americans and the world to the danger six months before Hitler’s war machine invades Poland and begins the march toward WWII.   The journalist was Alan Cranston, future Senator from California, a leader in the United States Senate, and candidate for President. Cranston dedicated his life to public service, nuclear arms reduction, and world peace.

Author: Lorraine Tong

Rating: Rating: 4.80 / 5
55 reviews

Longshot in Missouri (The Longshot Series Book 1) by Keith R. Baker

Set in the Western theatre of the US Civil War during the crucial first 18 months, this first novel in the Longshot series introduces Rob Finn to Allan Pinkerton and others who will travel his journey.

Peopled with realistic characters and settings, the story, its plot, locations and cast are drawn from extensive original genealogical and historical research by the author. Introducing fictitious characters to the actual players of those tumultuous times, is both rewarding and challenging for reader and author alike.

Keith R. Baker enjoys genealogy and historical research as hobbies, and has long believed that the best historical fiction tales will always offer enough insight to the period being recorded to allow readers a learning opportunity. Coupled with mature story-telling skills, this makes a terrific and very readable book.

Author: Keith R. Baker

Rating: Rating: 4.20 / 5
527 reviews

Fields of the Fatherless by Elaine Marie Cooper

Winner of the 2014 Selah Award, YA Fiction
Winner of the 2014 Next Generation Indie Book Award, Best Religious Fiction
Winner of the 2014 Moonbeam Children’s Book Award, Best YA Religious Fiction

In the early months of 1775, war is brewing in the American colonies. Although frightened, eighteen-year-old Betsy Russell (an ancestor to actor Kurt Russell) of Menotomy Village, Massachusetts, wants to be prepared in case of attack by British troops. Her father, prosperous farmer Jason, is the fourth generation of Russells on this land yet their very rights as British Colonials are being stripped away one by one. Will the King of England take their land as well? Tensions are growing here in the countryside west of Boston and the outbreak of battle seems a certainty. Jason desperately wants to protect his family his wife, children and grandchildren and their future. Betsy makes every attempt to be prepared for the worst. But not even the American militia could have predicted the bloody massacre that was about to occur right on the Russells’ doorstep. If Betsy loses everything she holds dear, are the rights of all the Colonists endangered?

Fields of the Fatherless is based on a true story.

Author: Elaine Marie Cooper

Rating: Rating: 4.70 / 5
143 reviews

The Federalist Papers by John Jay

The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written and published anonymously in 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay exhorting voters to ratify the United States Constitution. The controversial arguments first presented here by three of America’s greatest patriots and political theorists are still hotly debated today.This new digital edition of The Federalist Papers includes a table of contents and an image gallery.

Author: John Jay

Rating: Rating: 4.60 / 5
1384 reviews

Common Sense (Wisehouse Classics Edition) by Thomas Paine

COMMON SENSE is a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775–76 that inspired people in the Thirteen Colonies to declare and fight for independence from Great Britain in the summer of 1776. The pamphlet explained the advantages of and the need for immediate independence in clear, simple language. It was published anonymously on January 10, 1776, at the beginning of the American Revolution and became an immediate sensation. It was sold and distributed widely and read aloud at taverns and meeting places.Washington had it read to all his troops, which at the time had surrounded the British army in Boston. In proportion to the population of the colonies at that time (2.5 million), it had the largest sale and circulation of any book published in American history. As of 2006, it remains the all-time best selling American title.COMMON SENSE presented the American colonists with an argument for freedom from British rule at a time when the question of whether or not to seek independence was the central issue of the day. Paine wrote and reasoned in a style that common people understood. Forgoing the philosophical and Latin references used by Enlightenment era writers, he structured COMMON SENSE as if it were a sermon, and relied on Biblical references to make his case to the people. He connected independence with common dissenting Protestant beliefs as a means to present a distinctly American political identity. Historian Gordon S. Wood described COMMON SENSE as “the most incendiary and popular pamphlet of the entire revolutionary era”.

Author: Thomas Paine

Rating: Rating: 4.60 / 5
1437 reviews

Deadly Proof (A Victorian San Francisco Mystery Book 4) by M. Louisa Locke

It’s the summer of 1880, and once again the lovely and inquisitive businesswoman, Annie Fuller, is helping San Francisco lawyer and beau, Nate Dawson, with a troublesome case. Nate’s client, a female typesetter accused of murdering her boss, refuses to help in her own defense. Complicating matters, Nate’s sister Laura insists on getting involved in the potentially dangerous investigation, while Laura’s friend Seth Timmons, troubled Civil War veteran, finds himself a witness for the prosecution. Will Nate be able to win his first big case? Will Laura and Seth find some way of becoming friends? And finally, will Annie and Nate’s upcoming nuptials be derailed by their attempts to track down a killer?

Old friends and new readers alike will enjoy Deadly Proof, this fourth installment of the cozy Victorian San Francisco Mystery series that blends light romance, suspense, and a glimpse into the lives of late 19th century women who worked.

Author: M. Louisa Locke

Rating: Rating: 4.30 / 5
547 reviews

Trail of Thread: A Woman’s Westward Journey (Trail of Thread Series Book 1) by Linda Hubalek

Trail of Thread: A Woman’s Westward Journey, Historical Letters 1854-1855
Trail of Thread Series, Book 1

Taste the dust of the road and feel the wind in your face as you travel with a Kentucky family by wagon train to the new territory of Kansas in 1854.
Find out what it was like for the thousands of families who made the cross-country journey into the unknown.

In this first book of the Trail of Thread series; in the form of letters she wrote on the journey, Deborah Pieratt describes the scenery, the everyday events on the trail, and the task of taking care of her family. Stories of humor and despair, along with her ongoing remarks about camping, cooking, and quilting on the wagon trail make you feel as if you pulled up stakes and are traveling with the Pieratt’s, too.

But hints of the brewing trouble ahead plagued them along the way as people questions their motive for settling in the new territory. If they are from the South, why don’t they have slaves with them? Would the Pieratt’s vote for or against legal slavery in the new state? Though Deborah does not realize it, her letters show how this trip affected her family for generations to come.

This series is based on author Linda K. Hubalek’s ancestors that traveled from Kentucky to Kansas in 1854. Twelve old quilt patterns are mentioned in the letters, and the sketched designs are in the back of the book for reference.

Author: Linda Hubalek

Rating: Rating: 4.40 / 5
197 reviews